Swaziland Digital
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Swaziland photos


 
1920's - photos 61 to 69 of 69.
About the 1920's

 
613.  Ngwenyama Sobhuza 1921
1921
Photographer: Unknown    Photo Source: Stephens family

A formal portrait of Ngwenyama Sobhuza II in 1921 on the day when his grandmother, the Queen Regent Labotsibeni, also known as Gwamile, abdicated in his favour as leader of the Swazi Nation.
623.  Rural catholic service
1920s
Photographer: Brother Serti Vittorio    Photo Source: National Archives

The Catholics started missionary work in Swaziland in the 1920s long after other Christian missions had arrived. The Wesleyans were first here in 1844. Despite their late start their vast worldwide organisation allowed them to quickly become dominant. At first churches were small and rural, like this one, St Allesua at Hlangeni. Soon however large churches and missions were constructed. The different missionary sects divided the country into theological concessions so that they would not clash in the drive to recruit converts, in practice an area between two rivers might be Lutheran territory, whilst another would be Catholic or Anglican. There was gentleman's agreement that missionaries would not poach converts from each other's areas.
625.  St Peregrines Mission
1926
Photographer: Unknown    Photo Source: National Archives

The Catholics started missionary work in Swaziland in the 1920s long after other Christian missions had arrived. The Wesleyans were first here in 1844. Despite their late start the vast worldwide organisation allowed them to quickly become dominant. These are Catholic Mantallate Sisters in 1926, photo presumed taken by S Vilkrio.
626.  St Peregrines Mission
1927
Photographer: Brother Serti Vittorio    Photo Source: National Archives

The Catholics started missionary work in Swaziland in the 1920s long after other Christian missions had arrived. The Wesleyans were first here in 1844. Despite their late start the vast worldwide organisation allowed them to quickly become dominant. These are two clerics, Father Agostinho Biagoli and Brother Julius Potiver starting construction of St Peregrines Mission near Bulandzeni in 1927. The land for the mission was donated to the chuch by Leo Franklin. Today the mission is well established and under the leadership of Father Maurice O'Gorman.
629.  Catholic leader
1920s
Photographer: Unknown    Photo Source: National Archives

This is the head of the Catholic Church in Swaziland in the 1920s. He was officially titled Monseigneur Romvald Migliorini, second Prefect Apostolic of the Catholic Churches of Swaziland.
638.  Lomawa
1928
Photographer: Duggan-Cronin    Photo Source: National Archives

The Queen Mother or Indlovukazi Lomawa, mother of King Sobhuza. She was photographed by V Duggan-Cronin, a photographer hired by the de Beers Mining House to photograph and record one tribe a year in southern Africa. He did so for many years and these photos provide an invaluable record. Most of them are housed in the McGregor Museum in Kimberley.
641.  Warrior taking snuff
1920s
Photographer: O Tugwell    Photo Source: National Archives

Colonialism spread plants around the world. The two earliest widespread plants introduced to south eastern Africa were maize and tobacco, from about 1750 onwards. In Swaziland tobacco was usualy taken as snuff in the 19th century, rather than smoked. People carried elaborate finely carved snuff containers which were a mark of rank and status. This photograph was taken by O Tugwell who had a curio shop in Mbabane from the twenties to the fifties. He was also a keen photographer, although he only had one arm in an age of cumbersome cameras, he recorded traditional life and sold the photos as postcards in his shop. This was originally a postcard.
644.  Chief Bokweni Mamba
1920s
Photographer: Unknown    Photo Source: Pierce Family

1876 - 1940 he was the son of Matja I and chief of the Mamba clan who dominated southeast Swaziland at the start of the colonial era in the 1880s. At that time they celebrated their own Incwala, the ceremony of kingship. However concessionaires needed one king and one authority to validate their concessions and the British only recognised one king, of the iNkhosi Dlamini clan. The Mambas then gradually lost power. Chief Bokweni accepted the situation with public grace and died a respected man in 1940 with 46 wives and about 5000 followers. In the photo he is wearing a necklace of lion claws, probably from an animal that he had killed himself, with a spear.
680.  grinding meal
1920s
Photographer: O Tugwell    Photo Source: Swaziland Digital Archives

A married Swazi woman in the 1920s grinding mealie meal in the traditional way with her family.

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